Exploring Norway’s Majestic Landscapes: Geirangerfjord

A panorama of the deep blue UNESCO-protected Geirangerfjord and the surrounding majestic, snow-covered mountain peaks, wild waterfalls and lush, green vegetation, Geiranger, Norway; photographed at 1,500 meters (nearly 4,900 feet) elevation at the Dalsnibba utsiktspunkt (Dalsnibba outlook), south-south-east of the fjord

 

From the coastal town of Ålesund, Norway, our ship sailed a short distance to the southeast and entered the Sunnylvsfjorden, of which the Geirangerfjord (English: Geiranger Fjord) is a 15-mile long branch.

 

From our ship, anchored in Geirangerfjord (in the lower right of the photograph), we rode in tender boats to a pier in the small village of Geiranger, Norway, at the eastern end of the fjord (center of photograph), where we took a panoramic drive along the steep, winding roadway known as Ørnesvegen (Eagle’s Road), featuring 11 hairpin turns and some of Norway’s most famous vistas and stopped at the Eagle Road viewpoint where this image was made at an elevation of 515 meters (1,690 feet)

 

Geirangerfjord and the twisting, winding Trollstigen mountain road viewed from the viewpoint (“Skywalk”) at the top of Dalsnibba Mountain, Geirangerfjord, Norway

 

Glaciers (yes, small ones, but the snow does not melt during the summer) on the top of Dalsnibba Mountain, Geirangerfjord, Norway

Situated at the head of the stunning Geirangerfjord, the small village of Geiranger is a UNESCO Natural Heritage Site with some of the deepest, narrowest and most beautiful fjords in the world. Geiranger is in the process of being certified as a Sustainable Destination, a seal of approval given to destinations that work systematically to reduce the negative impact of tourism. In addition to providing visitors with enjoyable experiences, Geiranger wishes to preserve the local nature, culture, and environment, strengthen social values, and be economically viable.

 

A close up of the small village of Geiranger, Norway, photographed from our last viewpoint driving back down the winding Trollstigen mountain road from Dalsnibba Mountain

Posted by Rich E.
August 8, 2018